115 and counting…

Posted: January 3, 2013 in Uncategorized
Tags: , , , , ,

If my last post regarding Android devices being marshaled into zombie armies sounded a little over the top maybe this one will resonate a little better.

According to forensic blog, which focuses on mobile phone forensics and malware, as of December 26, 2012, there are 115 unique Android malware families known to exist. That number would be significantly higher if you counted all the variations on these that might be circulating.

115 doesn’t sound like a lot compared to the tens of thousands of Windows viruses in existence but its a far cry from zero and should serve as a wake up call regarding the need for malware protection on mobile devices. If that still doesn’t convince you then maybe the analysis regarding the threat that these present might:

Families that steal personal information 51,3 %
Families that send premium rated SMS messages 30,1 %
Families with characteristics of a Botnet 23,5 %
Families that contain Root-Exploits 18,3 %
Families downloaded from the Google-Play Market 11,3 %
Families that install additional applications 10,4 %
Families that steal location related data 8,7 %
Potentially unwanted applications 7,8 %
Online-Banking Trojans 3,5 %

Source: forensic blog, http://forensics.spreitzenbarth.de/

And don’t get too smug because your phone or tablet runs iOS. We had this debate years ago when people claimed that Mac OS was immune and then again with UNIX/Linux. Granted, the relative risk might be lower over the entire population of these install bases but the fact remains that any functional OS can be exploited because none are perfect.

Put more succinctly, all software (of any significant complexity) has bugs and some percentage of those bugs will be security-related, therefore, all software carries with it a set of security risks.

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Comments
  1. Malwares are moving to tablettes and mobile. Will this ever stop ?

    • I see no reason to think that it will. Just look at PCs.
      No one has ever found a way to put an end to malware in
      that environment despite decades of trying. I don’t see
      why mobile devices would be any different, unfortunately.

  2. […] 115 and counting … (a reference to the number of unique Android malware families) […]

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